English Arabic Chinese (Traditional) French German Italian Spanish

  • 0000 gianfranco daversa 2016   thp
  • 0000 follow me on tiwtter bhp
  • 0000 like my facebook page bhp
  • my social network
  • SUPPORTED PLATFORMS

0003 proud to be
  • gianfranco daversa 01
  • abu dhabi uni
  • gianfranco daversa 06
  • gianfranco daversa 16
  • gianfranco daversa sole project
  • ad 2
  • gianfranco daversa 03
  • gianfranco daversa 05
  • CD2
  • gianfranco daversa 07
  • book 1
  • gianfranco daversa 08
  • gianfranco daversa 09
  • gianfranco daversa 10
  • gianfranco daversa 12
  • cd1
  • gianfranco daversa 13
  • gianfranco daversa 14
  • aa01
  • ict events
  • aa02
  • gda1
  • ict events lim
  • book 2

Stay on Track with the Teachit Timer

Written by Gianfranco D'Aversa.

cornice 12

So, you want to get the most out of instructional time? Then think about adding an online timer to your teacher techbox. Although there are many from which to choose, check out Teachit Timer, a free and simple countdown tool that includes two nifty features: In addition to displaying time elapsed, it also shows the time remaining. And users can even choose to sound an alarm when time is up as well.

Read more

iPad Archaeology - Studying Ancient Egypt

Written by Gianfranco D'Aversa.

cornice 6

I always loved Egypt as a kid - I think was the mystery, the magic and the element of the unknown that created the romantic idea. That and Carter's discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb and the subsequent series of fatal events that surrounded the discover. I even thought I wanted to be an Archeologist at one stage. Whenever you go to a schools and see kids exploring Egypt for a project or inquiry based learning activity it always generates so much enthusiasm and energy. I thought it might be fun to explore some of the apps on offer for exploring ancient Egypt and the re-discoveries that have been made in the last 200 years.

Read more

The London Array

Written by Gianfranco D'Aversa.

cornice 7

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes. The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image.

White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames. To date, the London Array includes 175 wind turbines aligned to the prevailing southwest wind and spread out across 100 square kilometers (40 square miles). Each turbine stands 650 to 1,200 meters apart (2,100 to 3,900 feet) and 147 meters (482 feet) tall. Each is connected by cables buried in the seafloor, and power is transmitted to two substations offshore and to an onshore station at Cleve Hill.

Read more

Solar Dynamics Observatory Shows Sun's Rainbow of Wavelengths

Written by Gianfranco D'Aversa.

cornice 8

This still image was taken from a new NASA movie of the sun based on data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, showing the wide range of wavelengths – invisible to the naked eye – that the telescope can view. SDO converts the wavelengths into an image humans can see, and the light is colorized into a rainbow of colors. Yellow light of 5800 Angstroms, for example, generally emanates from material of about 10,000 degrees F (5700 degrees C), which represents the surface of the sun.

Extreme ultraviolet light of 94 Angstroms, which is typically colorized in green in SDO images, comes from atoms that are about 11 million degrees F (6,300,000 degrees C) and is a good wavelength for looking at solar flares, which can reach such high temperatures. By examining pictures of the sun in a variety of wavelengths – as is done not only by SDO, but also by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- scientists can track how particles and heat move through the sun's atmosphere.

Read more

Solar Eclipse Myths From Around the World

Written by Gianfranco D'Aversa.

cornice 9

Viking sky wolves, Korean fire dogs, and African versions of celestial reconciliation - these are only some of the many ways people around the world, and through the ages, have sought to explain solar eclipses.

People in equatorial Africa will be treated to a rare view of a total solar eclipse this Sunday, November 3. Those living on the eastern North American coast, northern South America, southern Europe, or the Middle East, will get to see a partial solar eclipse. "If you do a worldwide survey of eclipse lore, the theme that constantly appears, with few exceptions, is it's always a disruption of the established order," said E. C. Krupp, director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, California. That's true of both solar and lunar eclipses. "People depend on the sun's movement," Krupp said. "[It's] regular, dependable, you can't tamper with it. And then, all of a sudden, Shakespearean tragedy arrives and time is out of joint. The sun and moon do something that they shouldn't be doing." What that disruption means depends on the culture, and not everyone views an eclipse as a bad thing, said Jarita Holbrook, a cultural astronomer at the University of the Western Cape in Bellville, South Africa. Some see it as a time of terror, while others look at a solar eclipse as part of the natural order that deserves respect, or as a time of reflection and reconciliation.

Read more

Gianfranco D'Aversa

Rome // Foggia // Abu Dhabi

DON'T MISS THE LATEST UPDATES!
CONNECT WITH ME.

Work with me

Writing this blog has given me the opportunity to work with some great people in the education community. I cannot accept every invitation that I receive, but I do give serious consideration to all invitations. If you are interested in having me speak at your School, College or Conference please use the email addresses below (Contacts) or complete and send this Form.

Thank you very much for your interest in my profile.

Contacts

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.